Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

John’s Climb

Thursday, November 22nd, 2018

Meet John Janowicz; a young man with an optimistic, kind and passionate character.  John lives with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, a condition confining him to a wheel chair with restricted use of his limbs, a condition that appears to limit the opportunity to climb a tree.  But thanks to a timely meeting with young arborist DJ Neustaeter (with Arboriculture Canada) and John’s motivation, belief and perseverance, an opportunity was born.

With the full support of the Janowicz family, an experienced team of arborists redefined the tree climbing experience and facilitated John’s Climb 100 foot into a Douglas Fir at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.  We are humbled by John and his family and are proud to have supported him in this experience.  From the spark which initiated the vision to the culmination of success, John’s Climb transformed the lives of everyone involved.   View the short trailer below, and see the full documentary here:  www.intreemedia.com/johnsclimb

See the full mini documentary here: www.intreemedia.com/johnsclimb

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. provides comprehensive safety and skills training to staff.

Friday, July 17th, 2015

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 and 2016 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Biology & Care

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Tree Rope Access

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Aerial Lift Operations & Fall Protection

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in November of this year and in April of 2016.  The program is being partially funded by the Canada – Ontario Job Grant Program.

Arboriculture Canada customizes training programs to specifically meet the job requirements and unique training needs of your staff.  Our training programs are facilitated by experts in both adult education methods, as well as experts in the skills areas of arboriculture being taught.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety from the Canada Job Grant programs available in every province of Canada, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

Arborwood Tree Service is dedicated to providing superior customer service. Their great reputation is built on professionalism and customer satisfaction.  This training will ensure that staff meets this expectation.  www.arborwood.ca 

 

Advanced Tree Care provides high quality training to crews – 2015

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

Advanced Tree Care is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Technical Tree Falling & Cutting

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Aerial Lift Operations

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in August and October.  The program is being partially funded by the Ontario Job Grant Program.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

This video highlights week one of their training program – thanks for Kevin Mengers and Advanced Tree Care for sharing this with us!

Video Highlights

Advanced Tree Care facebook page.

 

Success Chainsaw Train the Trainer Event!

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Last week near Caroline, AB – a successful week of Chainsaw Train the Trainer.  Here is a re-cap!

https://vimeo.com/110079520

Group Photo 2014 Caroline, AB

Free Falling – novel written by ACTE Instructor – Tony Tresselt

Friday, November 29th, 2013

CoverI love stories.  They help us learn, remember, connect.  They can bind cultures and cohorts. They often define friends and enemies.   Arboriculture is rich with history, personalities and events.  It makes for great stories whether truth, fiction or somewhere in between.  With my first novel Free Falling I plunge into the world of competitive tree climbing, the sights, the sounds, the people.  Here is an excerpt from the back cover.

A small group of ecoterrorists storms a Pacific Northwest logging site.  Equipment is vandalized, buildings broken into and a surprise discovery is made by one member of the group; one that could solve all his current problems.

Day one of the International Tree Climbing Championship winds to a close.  Fifty-six men and women climbers have given their best in the preliminaries.  The final climber in the work climb event begins his run.  All eyes are watching him.  Unexpectedly, his rope parts and he plunges to his death mid swing…

Mike Duncan, arborist and former Special Forces solider, watches the climber plummet to earth from his perch high in the tree.  Later, after the crowd disperses, Mike, ascends the work climb tree.  There, high in the canopy, he makes a discovery of his own…

Buy it now through Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Free-Falling-An-Arboreal-Novel/dp/1604949759/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1385754294&sr=8-15&keywords=Free+Falling

The Women’s Arboriculture Conference – Mar. 5 – 7, 2014

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

The Women’s Arboriculture Conference is a unique experience as it is an inter-disciplinary forum addressing trees, their place in our world and our relationship with them. Speakers and delegates who are arborists, foresters, horticulturalists, landscape architects and designers, land planners and managers, and master gardeners are meeting with the shared purpose of discussing and problem-solving tree-related issues.

When:  Mar. 5 – 7, 2014

What:  The Women’s Arboriculture Conference provides a venue where women speakers, under represented at industry conferences, who are expert in their fields, provide solid technical, management, and policy information, creating an interdisciplinary environment where professionals can expand their viewpoints and make lasting, productive connections.

Where:  The 2014 Conference will be held
at Harrison Hot Springs Resort and Spa
http://www.harrisonresort.com

URL:  http://www.womenarborists.ca/

 

Arboriculture Canada is proud to sponsor and support this event.

Standard Operating Procedures or Guidelines

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

This presentation was given by Dwayne Neustaeter at both the Western Chapter and the ISA Annual Conferences, and he would be happy to visit other chapters to present his findings on Standard Operating Procedures in the future.  Printed by SCA Today – August, 2013 

Does your company have policies and procedures?

Do you have a checklist or document that simply and concisely shows how your organization meets industry standards or best practices?

Standard Operating procedures and guidelines provide a detailed and specific explanation or list of how your staff performs various work activities, especially ones where no industry standard exists, such as static single rope work positioning.

The difference between policy and procedures is that they are generic, the same is true for industry standards like ANSI or CSA, they are there to serve as a guide but do not provide detailed specifics in implementation. Standard operating procedures or guidelines are unique to a company or organization. Industry standards and governmental regulation are developed by committee and are therefore inherently generic. Standard operating procedures should be developed by the people who are doing the work; everyone who is part of the organization should be part of the development of SOP’s or SOG’s.

Many people ask for a copy of an SOP or SOG that is already developed; this is where the process could begin to break down. I am not saying that we need to re-invent the wheel, but as we all know many aspects of tree work have subtle variances and nuances; a company’s SOP’s and SOG’s are where these are to be noted or documented. A well-developed SOG or SOP well explain or identify the variations in technique and/or implementation that is unique to your organization. Make it your own!

Some of the history of SOP’s and SOG’s lies with the fire service, and I believe there some unique similarities between tree work and firefighting. The most obvious is the unique nature of fire: every fire has its own way of burning, no one structure fire is the same as any other, there are far too many variables that can come into play. In tree work, the tree is our fire: every tree is unique, no one tree is the same as any other. Another similarity between the fire service and the tree industry is geographic and local variation. In the fire service, building construction and type carries dramatically within a geographical location; the same holds true for trees. Even trees of the same species will have vastly different wood characteristics in different parts of the country or geographical region.

With nothing to work from, fire departments needed to develop some guidelines and procedures to help everyone learn from other’s experiences and provide some type of proof that they were operating in a safe and reputable fashion. Firefighting is a work environment that is very difficult to be assessed or understood by inspectors or investigators, the same is true for the tree care industry. When there is a fatality, the questions start to get asked and generally tree care companies are not prepared and do not have the documentation that can explain or show that they were working to meet safety and due diligence requirements. In these cases, it is simply not enough to provide certifications and credentialing. Ask anyone who has had to experience and live through the death of an employee.

In learning about and researching this topic, I found that there are some distinctions made between SOP’s and SOG’s. The following is an overview of both as I understand them.

Standard Operating Procedures:

1.   Document how your organization performs certain work activities, and your compliance with current industry standards or legislation,

2.   Have been developed by everyone involved in performing those activities,

3.   Address prioritized high risk work activities your company or organization performs; and are

4.   Specific and detailed and include industry standard references regarding specifications.

Standard Operating Guidelines are:

1.   Similar to operating procedures, but exist solely to provide guidance where no industry standard exists.

I know that the terms are often used interchangeably and not everyone bothers to make a distinction of one from the other. I also know that companies who want to be prepared for the day a ‘bad’ accident arrives are developing more refined work procedures like SOP’s or SOG’s. The evidence is in the fatality statistics we all hear about, and that alone should be enough to show that we need to do everything we can to ensure the safety of our workforce. It is incumbent on all of us involved in this business of arboriculture.

The following is an example of a SOG I have worked on; remember to make your SOG or SOP your own. The best way to develop your own is to have all workers involved play a key role in the development of your organization’s SOP’s or SOG’s.

Tree Climbing Standard Operating Guideline -2013

Static or Single Rope Tree Climbing Systems – SRT

I.      Tree climbers are workers who are competent in the establishment of tree climbing systems, from equipment selection to implementation.

II.      Tree climbers must have all necessary Personal Protective Equipment, including: hard hat, eye protection, and appropriate footwear.

III.      All climbing equipment must be Industry approved.

IV.      Each tree to be climbed is risk assessed and inspected for strength and stability, specifically the root system and tie in locations.

a.   Trees to be climbed are to be visually inspected and, when deemed necessary, further assessed by being sounded with a mallet and/or field pull tested, prior to selecting tie in location.

b.   Tie in locations must be visible from the ground prior to ascending. If tie in locations are not visible, a lower visible tie in location must be selected and or alternate ascent methods, such as spurs, utilized.

c.   Tie in locations must be a minimum diameter of 6 inches and climbing lines must be attached to these tie locations in such a way as to minimize drifting or sliding of the line away from the stem or along the branch.

d.   Tie in locations must be on branches that have strong, more open ‘U’ shaped attachments not narrow or tight ‘V’ shaped.


V.      An approved climbing line is installed onto a selected temporary anchor point location in the canopy of the tree and one end of the climbing line is anchored to the base of the tree being climbed.

VI.      The temporary anchor point is field tested by performing pull and load tests.

VII.      Approved connecting links, cordage and harnesses are selected and knots and hitches are tied, dressed and set to establish a static suspension climbing system.

a.   Approved cordage with termination knots or eye splices is used to tie a climbing hitch to the static line with approved connecting links.

b.   A dynamic climbing system (as described in DdRT) connects the climber to the climbing hitch and static line with approved connecting links and pulleys.

c.   An ascending device is attached to the lead of the static line below the climbing hitch d.   Climbing aids and tethers are attached to the ascending device

VIII.      The climber ascends in the static suspension climbing system and then repositions to a dynamic working system to conduct work activities.

a.    The repositioning to a dynamic system can be done by establishing a new temporary anchor point or by spiking the static line just below the static climbing hitch and working off of the dynamic system attaching the climber to the static line; however the static suspension system is primarily used for entry only into tall tree canopies.

IX.      All work is performed with the climber tied in at all times, and when operating saws the worker shall be double tied.

X.      Whenever feasible during ascent, the climber shall utilize a lanyard or secondary climbing system as a back-up.

XI.      In the event a climber has to establish another temporary anchor point it must also be inspected and assessed prior to use, and the temporary anchor and climbing system must be load tested prior to use.

XII.      Tree climbers climb smoothly and avoid unnecessary shock loading that can be generated by swings or falls, this is achieved by keeping all lines tensioned and slack free at all times and by employing the use of a work positioning lanyard whenever possible, especially when using saws.

XIII.      Tree climbers shall not climb above their temporary anchor points or climb horizontally or away from the temporary anchor point to where their climbing rope angle exceeds 45 degrees from the perpendicular axis of the temporary anchor point.

I trust this has expanded your knowledge and has helped you understand the differences between certifications, industry standards, legislation, operating procedures and guidelines. The most challenging and rewarding aspect of developing these type of documents is getting all workers participating and involved. Though this requires the investment of resources like time, the benefits of getting everyone talking about how they do things and with what kind of tools and equipment include not only the reduction of accidents and injury, but the process of development and implementation helps build morale, and improves workers’ knowledge and understanding of their position. Really, it is a win-win investment.

Dwayne Neustaeter is the current President-elect on the SCA Board, and is also the President of Arboriculture Canada, an organization focusing on meeting the training and education needs of arborists and those in related industries. Dwayne’s background and experience complement his current activities of instructing, program development, and qualification testing in the field. He instructs training programs and seminars on safety and a wide range of skills for arborists around the world.

Arboriculture Canada delivers Utility Tree Trimmer and Worker Training in Alberta – March, 2013

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

This March saw the first off campus delivery of the Utility Tree Worker (UTW)/Utility Tree Trimmer (UTT) training program in Alberta.  The Industrial Vegetation Management Association of Alberta (IVMAA) oversees the training program and certification of the provincially recognized certification. The UTW/UTT certification, is an Alberta provincially recognized certification that is mandatory for all persons who perform vegetation maintenance around energized power lines and ground work around energized power lines. It is also recognized by Saskatchewan and Manitoba through IVMA ManSask.   Before candidates can apply for this certification, they must take the UTW/UTT training program as this is a mandatory course required by all persons seeking to receive their UTW/UTT certification.

The IVMAA is the only recognized organization that can issue these provincially recognized certifications for successful UTW/UTT graduates. Successful candidates must have completed this training program and also accumulate 1200 hours working in proximity to energized electrical equipment, and these hours must be logged and verified in a log book by an already accredited UTW/UTT. The difference between a UTW and a UTT is that a UTT has to log a minimum of 600 hours working in proximity to energized electrical equipment from an aerial position.

The training component has been and continues to be traditionally delivered by Olds College in Olds, AB.   Arboriculture Canada has been getting requests for many years from customers who would like to get the UTW/UTT training but are unable to send their people away for two weeks or who missed the window when the course was offered at the college and are unable to wait until the next offer.

Arboriculture Canada delivers training components in their regular courses offerings to customers across Canada that is also part of the UTW training program and therefore has the resources to develop course content and materials for a Utility Tree Worker Training program. ArborCanada made a request through application to the IVMAA seeking recognized equivalence to the IVMAA UTW/UTT course.

Through a process of communications and meetings, Arboriculture Canada’s program was granted equivalency and a successful delivery of the program was completed in early March at an off campus location. This program was the culmination of many years of hard work, meetings and passing stringent requirements and in the end it was the first time since the beginning of the IVMAA UTW/UTT certification program that it was delivered off campus and the first time a private training company has delivered the course.  Arboriculture Canada’s course is stringent and broad in scope and combined with the electrical training it encompasses 13 days of training.

The group that received the training in March of 2013 was the East Prairie Metis Settlement. The Metis are first nation people who started families with the white settlers in the 1800’s.  There are over 500 thousand Metis in Canada today. The training took place at their site and location, near High Prairie Alberta, where the Great Plains and the boreal forest converge – a land of lakes, rivers, aspen, spruce and pine and the theoretical in-class learning was complimented by tying knots by the fire, climbing, rigging and other practical hands on time in the field.

Congratulations to the successful graduates of the first off campus Utility Tree Worker and Utility Tree Trimmer training and qualification program.

 


Arboriculture Canada has found a new chainsaw training site in Vancouver

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Arboriculture Canada has found a new training site for our chainsaw and tree cutting courses in the Vancouver area for 2013. All of our open enrollment courses that involve the cutting of trees will now be held in the District of North Vancouver.  Thank you to the District of North Vancouver for your partnership!

Tree Climbing Competition Memories!

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Check out this video – you might find yourself in it!  A collection of memories from past competitions – chapter and international.  http://www.youtube.com/user/ArbCan?feature=mhee