Posts Tagged ‘Arboriculture Training in Canada’

Arboriculture Canada delivers training for Maritime College of Forest Technology

Monday, July 25th, 2016

When the Maritime College of Forest Technology (MCFT) first started designing the Utility Arborist Program (UAP), they approached Arboriculture Canada Training and Education Ltd.  (ACTE).  ACTE will be providing 160 hours of theoretical and hand’s on practical instruction to UAP students.  See details here:  http://utilityarborist.ca/blog/

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. provides comprehensive safety and skills training to staff.

Friday, July 17th, 2015

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 and 2016 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Biology & Care

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Tree Rope Access

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Aerial Lift Operations & Fall Protection

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in November of this year and in April of 2016.  The program is being partially funded by the Canada – Ontario Job Grant Program.

Arboriculture Canada customizes training programs to specifically meet the job requirements and unique training needs of your staff.  Our training programs are facilitated by experts in both adult education methods, as well as experts in the skills areas of arboriculture being taught.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety from the Canada Job Grant programs available in every province of Canada, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

Arborwood Tree Service is dedicated to providing superior customer service. Their great reputation is built on professionalism and customer satisfaction.  This training will ensure that staff meets this expectation.  www.arborwood.ca 

 

Advanced Tree Care provides high quality training to crews – 2015

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

Advanced Tree Care is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Technical Tree Falling & Cutting

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Aerial Lift Operations

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in August and October.  The program is being partially funded by the Ontario Job Grant Program.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

This video highlights week one of their training program – thanks for Kevin Mengers and Advanced Tree Care for sharing this with us!

Video Highlights

Advanced Tree Care facebook page.

 

Canada Job Grants – funding available for employers to train workforce.

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

The Canada Job Grant is an employer-driven training program. This means that employers decide on who gets training and what type of training may be needed for new and existing employees. Employers must use a third-party training provider to deliver the formal training either onsite, online, or in a classroom setting.

It is in an employer’s best interest to invest in developing the skills of their workforce, so they can get the job done and continue to operate.

The Canada Job Grant is part of the federal and provincial governments commitment to help address skills mismatches and ensure that employees are being trained in high-demand areas.

Arboriculture Canada recommends you to take advantage of this opportunity for funding to receive training for your workers in the specialized industry of arboriculture and other high angle or professional chainsaw operating work fields.  We have been approved as an eligible training body in Ontario, and expect the same in other provinces.  Please contact us to receive course outlines and quotations which are needed in order to apply for this funding.  We will do our best to provide any necessary information needed by our customers to assist you in receiving the funding.

For information about this grant, and to find each province’s page and application forms, please go to:  http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/training_agreements/cjg/info.shtml

 

Canada – Ontario Job Grant – funding is available for employers to train workforce in Ontario.

Monday, January 26th, 2015

On March 28, 2014, Ontario signed the Canada-Ontario Job Fund Agreement with the federal government. The agreement is a key source of funding for new initiatives to help Ontario’s employers develop their workforce through employer-led training.

We have found out that Arboriculture Canada is an eligible training body.  Therefore, this is a very good opportunity for Ontario employers to apply for funding, either to send staff to our open enrolment/public training courses scheduled in various places in Ontario  http://www.arborcanada.com/arboriculture_training_schedules.php  or to book a private, customized training program at your site.

To find out more about the grant money available, please go to:   http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/eopg/cojg/index.html    This is also where you need to submit your application to receive this funding.

Arboriculture Canada will work together with you to provide the curriculum, a quotation etc. according to what you request to complete your application.  Please contact Nancy at nancy@arborcanada.com  or by phone 1-877-268-8733 or direct 403-556-1701 to request these items when you making application.

 

The Key Notch

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

In some cases, trees are hung or snagged because they have been uprooted.  In these situations determining where the loads are concentrated can be difficult, and often the root plate is a stronger force to be considered than the hung tree itself.  Gravity is always acting on mass and never takes a day off.

This uncertain circumstance presents challenges that must be considered when attempting to cut the tree free from obstacles.  The main focus of the cuts I have described in my past two articles (mis-match cut and controlled hinge release) has been to allow the cutter to be at a safe distance when the final cut is released and the tree falls and is cleared from its snagged position.  The use of rope and mechanical advantage allows cuts to be released in a controlled manner and the tree to be pulled from a safe working distance while trying to free it.  For safety’s sake always plan, prepare and use an escape route.  Avoid cutting and releasing a snagged tree while standing next to it by creating a barrier using distance and rope.  The further away you are from the snagged tree, the better (within reason), but a good rule of thumb is to be a distance away that is equal to the height of the snagged tree.

The key notch is a technique for freeing a hung or snagged tree that releases all holding wood while maintaining control until a pull force is applied.  It takes some time to cut and works well on trees that are hung and snagged where the compression and tension forces are very difficult to identify, such as with uprooted trees.

First evaluate and determine the zones most likely under compression and tension.  In the case of an uprooted tree, the compression and tension zones can be exactly opposite that of a tree in the same hung or snagged position that is not uprooted.  The techniques of the key notch will work the same for either situation.  This is why it works well for trees where it is difficult to determine how much force the root plate is applying.

The key notch is made by making five cuts into the trunk; the first three cuts utilize the bore cut technique, cutting through the trunk and forming a tongue and groove – or ‘key’.  The tongue and side of the groove should be of equal size or thickness.  This is determined by dividing the trunk diameter into three equal parts.  In order to properly form the key notch, it is necessary that the trunk be at least three times the diameter of your chainsaw bar width.

key notchBefore making the final two cuts, wedges are installed to prevent saw bind and pinch.  The wedges are placed under the tongue on both sides of the trunk and wedges can also be inserted into the sides of the key as well.  This requires several wedges, but a minimum of two will often work.  The fourth cut is made in the compression zone and the final cut should be placed in the area of the trunk that is determined to be under tension.  By releasing a load in tension the kerf should open and allow the key notch to be completed without any bar pinching.  KeyNotch with wedges1blog

KeyNotch with Mechanical Advantageblog

Using mechanical advantage to pull the the snagged tree free.

Once the cuts are completed the worker should retreat to a safe working distance and pull the snagged tree out of the key, using a pre-installed pull line.  Pulling the tree out of the key may require more force than one person can apply and that is where mechanical advantage is incorporated into the pull.

It is my intention in writing these articles and sharing techniques, to add tools and techniques to the mental toolboxes of workers who use chainsaws to cut trees that are hung and snagged during or after storm events.  I realize that there are many different tools and techniques and I always encourage workers to stick with ones that have worked well for you.  I also equally encourage everyone to always keep an open mind and give new techniques a chance and a try.  See if they work for you, and when they do you have another tool for the toolbox!

Success Chainsaw Train the Trainer Event!

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Last week near Caroline, AB – a successful week of Chainsaw Train the Trainer.  Here is a re-cap!

https://vimeo.com/110079520

Group Photo 2014 Caroline, AB

Arboriculture Canada is a National Awarding Body (NAB) with the ABA (Awarding Body Association) International.

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

We are proud to announce that we have been accepted as members of the ABA International body.  Arboriculture Canada is now a National Awarding Body (NAB).  We would like to introduce the ABA to our customers in Canada, and especially the candidates who have successfully achieved qualification status (chainsaw) through our testing process in the past years.   (other domains to come)

This article will introduce you to the ABA International, and tell you what credentialing through the ABA can do for you.    http://www.aba-skills.com/about.php

Who is the ABA?

ABA International (Awarding Body Association) was founded in 2012 in response to a demand for international recognition of qualifications gained at state or national levels. The trans-national mobility of qualified people facilitated by a voluntary partnership of national awarding bodies is a core principle of ABA.

ABA is managed on a minimum administrative basis in a cost effective manner. A simplified organisational structure provides each member country equal representation within the association.

National awarding bodies (NAB) are subject to an International accreditation and vetting process. Core to quality assurance and uniformity of the qualifications is the principle of trans-national supervision. In support of this principle ABA continuously develops, updates and enhances International qualifications skills standards & matrices.

Partner agreements include general procedures for cooperation; transfer of qualification credits; national awarding body responsibilities; certification endorsement etc.

Further, ABA endeavours to promote the mutual recognition of its member’s qualifications world-wide therefore reducing or removing potential barriers to employment and mobility.

The ABA’s Mission:

To facilitate, accredit, develop, support and promote the recognition of individuals national skills qualifications and certifications between partner countries worldwide

THE ABA’s Mission Objectives:

Establishing & setting certification standards: undertake a continuous review & improvement process to ensure they remain consistent and rigorous Quality assurance of the certification: ensure validation of content, currency, delivery and review methods are consistently maintained and comparible

ABA has the following key roles:

  • Qualification development: maintaining a support network with international educational advisors
  • National Awarding Body support: ensuring good practice is maintained, encouraged, developed and facilitating communication
  • National Awarding Body external inspections & vetting process: facilitating trans-national observations of training & assessment practices and awarding body audits
  • Promoting the principle of continuous improvement: facilitating exchange opportunities between National Awarding Body instructors, assessors and educational advisors

Why Get ABA Certification?

National skills certification demonstrates that you have achieved a recognised standard within your skills or chosen occupational sector. In addition, the ABA International ‘stamp of approval’ on your certification provides the following benefits:

  • Enhanced mobility: instant participating partner country recognition no need to re-take already proven training or skills tests to work abroad (saving time & money)
  • Enhanced employability: demonstrates your competency at an international level to current or potential future employers(helping to break-down barriers)
  • Enhanced credibility: demonstrates proof of your skills verified to rigorous national and international standards (high quality)

Are you an Arboriculture Canada Qualified Technician in a Chainsaw Domain?

Arboriculture Canada has been given equivalency for chainsaw qualification with the ABA in the following chainsaw training domains.  If you have taken a chainsaw qualification test and successfully become a Qualified Technician in one of these domains in the last five years (since January, 2010), you will be receiving an email inviting you to register yourself for the ABA Certification.  The only thing required to receive this ABA Certification is a $12 processing fee and you will then be registered with the ABA Registry (which is an online registrar).  You will immediately be registered as an ABA Certified Candidate internationally.

Arboriculture Canada Chainsaw Qualification Programs and ABA Equivalencies:

Arboriculture Canada Qualification ABA Qualification
Chainsaw Safety & Cutting Techniques (Chainsaw Operator Technician) Chainsaw Level 1:  Chainsaw Maintenance & Cross-cutting Techniques
Technical Tree Falling & Cutting (Tree Faller Technician) Chainsaw Level 1:  Chainsaw Maintenance & Cross-Cutting Techniques andChainsaw Level 2:  Basic Tree Felling Techniques
Hazard & Danger Tree Cutting & Falling (Hazardous Tree Falling Technician)  (provided you have received the Tree Faller Technician) Chainsaw Level 3:  Advanced Tree Felling Techniques andChainsaw Level 4:  Windblown & Damaged Tree Felling Techniques.

For any candidates who have taken customized tests with Arboriculture Canada through your organization or company in the chainsaw domain, please contact Nancy to inquire which equivalency is applicable to your test.

Arboriculture Canada is choosing to endorse and support the goals and aims of the ABA, as we believe that the intentions align nicely with our corporate vision and the recognition of ABA qualifications around the world will serve to improve the safety of working arborists and chainsaw operators.

Champions of Technology – ArborCanada Featured!

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Arboriculture Canada was recently selected to be interviewed as a Champion of Technology in our community of Olds, AB.  Thank you to the Olds Institute for Community and Regional Development for this honor and for making the video about our business and our website tools.  We are pleased to continue to serve the industries of arboriculture and other high angle worker and chainsaw professionals in Canada.  To watch the video:  http://vimeo.com/91366343

 

Vimeo - Champions of Technology

What Makes a Good Instructor?

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Recently printed in the Continental Connection newsletter.

What sets one instructor apart from the majority?  Arboriculture Canada Training & Education Ltd. has developed a process for training and mentoring instructors that serves to do exactly that.

DSC03632 cropaAs owner and lead instructor of ACTE, Dwayne Neustaeter began to train and mentor instructors many years ago.  He has developed a train the trainer program that takes individuals through exercises that challenge them to develop the presentation and communication skills necessary to not only facilitate effective learning in attendees, but also to make learning engaging, entertaining and fun.

Dwayne sends out weekly emails (Platoon Weekly) to a team of over 100 people who have attended past Train the Trainer events with him to remind them of the principles of effective instruction and presentation.  If you have ever had the good fortune of attending a course, session or presentation conducted by Dwayne, chances are you were engaged, entertained and you remember a good deal of what you learned during that session.

If you are currently a leader in your organization, whether a supervisor, a crew foreman, a trainer or the owner – you might be interested in some of the tips that we use when training and mentoring our instructors.  We thought we would share some of them in this issue with you.

A fundamental concept to good instruction we use to help instructors remember how important the context of a learning environment is – is that “DATA doesn’t MATTA”.  This simply means that the context of a teaching environment is just as important to the learning environment as the data or content of the course or session.  As Dwayne recently explained in a message to platoon members:

I learned a unique way to teach a lesson about tree assessment from Alex Shigo.  He would ask a group to list above ground tree parts, and the lists would be quite vast.  Then, he would ask everythone to list below ground tree parts, generally called roots, and the list would pale by comparison.  The lesson – there is a lot more known about the above ground tree parts than there is about the below ground tree parts.  This becomes a lesson in tree biology.  However, I can also compare this lesson to teaching.  There is a lot of emphasis put on the data or content aspect of teaching, and yet, all parts are important in any system.  If you focus most heavily in one area over another, you will have an imbalance, so Data (Content) does Matta, but not at the expense of Context.  They both need to be considered equally for there to be success in learning.  Teaching is like tree assessment and we have to consider all parts above and below ground, content and context, in order to make reasonable and reliable assessments and lesson plans.  I am as passionate about content and context management in the classroom as I am about my passion to learn and understand trees above and below ground.

Train the Trainer

Train the Trainer

Dwayne attended a program called “Ultimate Leadership Camp” with Peak Potentials in August of this year, together with his friend and colleague Andrew Hordyk.  This is what he had to say about that experience:

This past week Andrew and I attended a five day course called ‘Ultimate Leadership Camp’.  This camp was delivered by the same instructor and company that I took my trainer courses from years ago, the courses from which I developed the content and format for the instructor/trainer intensives that Arboriculture Canada delivers.  It was a great course and one of the biggest things I learned was that as trainers or instructors we are also leaders – this goes hand in hand . . . like air and light, sun and heat or smell and taste.  The only difference between a leader and an instructor/trainer is timing and appointment.  There are times when you are the instructor/trainer by designation, however leaders are chosen by those they are together with.  Leadership is one of those things that other gives you – like your reputation.  The following is a list of some characteristics of a leader we learned at the course.  I challenge you to practice them in your life and watch what happens.

 

Accountable – take responsibility for results

Decisive – make decisions quickly

Courageous- act in spite of fear

Assertive – speak with authority, not aggressiveness

Calm- unemotional regardless of situation

Optimistic – believe things will work out

Confident – trust and believe in yourself

Compassionate – be understanding and care for others

Creative – plan, strategize and problem solve

Flexibility – adapt and be willing to embrace change

Integrity- be reliable and do what you say . . . ALWAYS

Passionate- never quit or give up

Action – act quickly and concisely when it is safe and secure

Pro-Active – take action on problems or opportunities as you see them develop . . . make things occur.

There are many important components of planning a training program, lesson plan, meeting or event that will facilitate and allow for trust and openness amongst participants and effective lasting learning.  Dwayne addresses them one by one in his trainer programs, as well as through his weekly messages.  The following is a weekly message that he wrote just prior to delivering a recent Chainsaw Train the Trainer event as he was preparing.

This week as I prepared for the Chainsaw Train the Trainer program, I was thinking about all the past classes and the memories I have each and every intensive I have been a part of.  I look forward to the learning that I know I will gain from working with new people with new experiences.  I am always reminded of the story about the mental tool box.  I first heard this story from Tim Ard and I have never forgotten it and have told it myself many times over.

Training and education truly is a journey, not a destination, and like the old toolbox in your garage or in your truck, your mental toolbox is dialy exposed to new experiences and interactions, particularly at a training event like a seminar or course.  It is important to remind people that you are teaching or leading that your purpose is simply to add to their mental toolbox.  Many of us had a junk drawer of tools, trinkets, special wrenches from the last BBQ or children’s toy you assembled.  The box gets bigger and bigger and for the most part you don’t throw much of it away, even though you may not use each tool very often or ever.  Why don’t you throw anything away?  The reason is because you know what that tool is for . . . and you might use it one day.  Experiences, training and education is a lot like that.  Each learning is valuable and means something specific to you.  When you are in a leadership or teaching position, you can start with this analogy and encourage enrollment from the class.  (by asking them to mimic the opening of the brain with their hands above their heads . . .)   It is a good way to let the audience know you are there to help, and more importantly you can end the session by reminding them of the toolbox analogy and request them to do one thing.  What is that request?  Ask everyone to simply keep an open mind because like a toolbox, if it is closed, nothing can get in!

It is such a great analogy because it also illustrates the important connection between training, education, information and experience, and how one without the other is not complete.  So much of how we learn is through synthesis of knowledge into practice – experience is the qualifier.  True or True!

Open up your toolbox to learn more!

Open up your toolbox to learn more!

Part of our trainer program involves the way that an instructor begins or introduces a program to a group of attendees.  They are taught to do the following things:

  1.  Scan
  2. Welcome, acknowledge, edify and name of talk
  3. W.I.I.F.M. (What’s in it for me?)
  4. E.T.R. (Earn the Right)

Each trainer is taught in detail the importance of each of these steps and examples of how to implement and practice this in relation to the topics of the content.  Dwayne wrote a short lesson on Earn The Right (E.T.R.) as follows:

How many of you have learned a lesson or gained respect for someone from listening to their story?

E.T.R. is where you tell a story that relates and applies to the topic you are teaching. It is a true story that explains why you are qualified to teach the course or present the topic. The story should be designed to give you the right to present on the topic and it should make your students understand that you know the material and have the experience to back up what you are going to be talking about. A good ETR is passionate and authentic, remember your truth is in your passion, and people don’t care what you know until they know that you care. An ETR can include or be a relational story about something you witnessed that impacted your life and/or effected change in you.

Your ETR builds confidence and ties in with your WIIFM. After your ETR your students are even more excited to hear what you have to say. Your ETR is personal and it is where you begin to establish a fundamental trust with your audience by making yourself vulnerable. It often is a story of a challenge or character building experience in which you learned a hard valuable lesson, a lesson you want to help other’s learn more easily. The basic concept is that we don’t have enough time to make all of the mistakes ourselves and that experience is one of our most valuable teachers, and so the more we can learn from others experiences the better, TRUE or TRUE.

A good ETR shows a willingness and more importantly a commitment to learn and share, like in all things practice and stick with stories that have worked well in the past. Your ETR is about experiences, it gives a relational human quality that resonates with those listening, it helps others relate and connect with you.

These are all snippets of advice from a master of instruction.  Dwayne has spent many years teaching around the world to people of many ages, walks of life and occupations.  He connects with people in a relational way and he learns from everyone he interacts with.  He has a gift of teaching – and those of you that have learned from him can understand his passion.

These are some of the principles that Arboriculture Canada nurtures in the instructors we use to teach our programs.  Dwayne and our team of instructors looks forward to working with more learners in 2014, and thanks all those attendees in 2013 for your participation, your passion and your commitment to learning!