Posts Tagged ‘Tree Felling’

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. provides comprehensive safety and skills training to staff.

Friday, July 17th, 2015

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 and 2016 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Biology & Care

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Tree Rope Access

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Aerial Lift Operations & Fall Protection

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in November of this year and in April of 2016.  The program is being partially funded by the Canada – Ontario Job Grant Program.

Arboriculture Canada customizes training programs to specifically meet the job requirements and unique training needs of your staff.  Our training programs are facilitated by experts in both adult education methods, as well as experts in the skills areas of arboriculture being taught.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety from the Canada Job Grant programs available in every province of Canada, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

Arborwood Tree Service is dedicated to providing superior customer service. Their great reputation is built on professionalism and customer satisfaction.  This training will ensure that staff meets this expectation.  www.arborwood.ca 

 

The Key Notch

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

In some cases, trees are hung or snagged because they have been uprooted.  In these situations determining where the loads are concentrated can be difficult, and often the root plate is a stronger force to be considered than the hung tree itself.  Gravity is always acting on mass and never takes a day off.

This uncertain circumstance presents challenges that must be considered when attempting to cut the tree free from obstacles.  The main focus of the cuts I have described in my past two articles (mis-match cut and controlled hinge release) has been to allow the cutter to be at a safe distance when the final cut is released and the tree falls and is cleared from its snagged position.  The use of rope and mechanical advantage allows cuts to be released in a controlled manner and the tree to be pulled from a safe working distance while trying to free it.  For safety’s sake always plan, prepare and use an escape route.  Avoid cutting and releasing a snagged tree while standing next to it by creating a barrier using distance and rope.  The further away you are from the snagged tree, the better (within reason), but a good rule of thumb is to be a distance away that is equal to the height of the snagged tree.

The key notch is a technique for freeing a hung or snagged tree that releases all holding wood while maintaining control until a pull force is applied.  It takes some time to cut and works well on trees that are hung and snagged where the compression and tension forces are very difficult to identify, such as with uprooted trees.

First evaluate and determine the zones most likely under compression and tension.  In the case of an uprooted tree, the compression and tension zones can be exactly opposite that of a tree in the same hung or snagged position that is not uprooted.  The techniques of the key notch will work the same for either situation.  This is why it works well for trees where it is difficult to determine how much force the root plate is applying.

The key notch is made by making five cuts into the trunk; the first three cuts utilize the bore cut technique, cutting through the trunk and forming a tongue and groove – or ‘key’.  The tongue and side of the groove should be of equal size or thickness.  This is determined by dividing the trunk diameter into three equal parts.  In order to properly form the key notch, it is necessary that the trunk be at least three times the diameter of your chainsaw bar width.

key notchBefore making the final two cuts, wedges are installed to prevent saw bind and pinch.  The wedges are placed under the tongue on both sides of the trunk and wedges can also be inserted into the sides of the key as well.  This requires several wedges, but a minimum of two will often work.  The fourth cut is made in the compression zone and the final cut should be placed in the area of the trunk that is determined to be under tension.  By releasing a load in tension the kerf should open and allow the key notch to be completed without any bar pinching.  KeyNotch with wedges1blog

KeyNotch with Mechanical Advantageblog

Using mechanical advantage to pull the the snagged tree free.

Once the cuts are completed the worker should retreat to a safe working distance and pull the snagged tree out of the key, using a pre-installed pull line.  Pulling the tree out of the key may require more force than one person can apply and that is where mechanical advantage is incorporated into the pull.

It is my intention in writing these articles and sharing techniques, to add tools and techniques to the mental toolboxes of workers who use chainsaws to cut trees that are hung and snagged during or after storm events.  I realize that there are many different tools and techniques and I always encourage workers to stick with ones that have worked well for you.  I also equally encourage everyone to always keep an open mind and give new techniques a chance and a try.  See if they work for you, and when they do you have another tool for the toolbox!

Success Chainsaw Train the Trainer Event!

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Last week near Caroline, AB – a successful week of Chainsaw Train the Trainer.  Here is a re-cap!

https://vimeo.com/110079520

Group Photo 2014 Caroline, AB

Arboriculture Canada is a National Awarding Body (NAB) with the ABA (Awarding Body Association) International.

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

We are proud to announce that we have been accepted as members of the ABA International body.  Arboriculture Canada is now a National Awarding Body (NAB).  We would like to introduce the ABA to our customers in Canada, and especially the candidates who have successfully achieved qualification status (chainsaw) through our testing process in the past years.   (other domains to come)

This article will introduce you to the ABA International, and tell you what credentialing through the ABA can do for you.    http://www.aba-skills.com/about.php

Who is the ABA?

ABA International (Awarding Body Association) was founded in 2012 in response to a demand for international recognition of qualifications gained at state or national levels. The trans-national mobility of qualified people facilitated by a voluntary partnership of national awarding bodies is a core principle of ABA.

ABA is managed on a minimum administrative basis in a cost effective manner. A simplified organisational structure provides each member country equal representation within the association.

National awarding bodies (NAB) are subject to an International accreditation and vetting process. Core to quality assurance and uniformity of the qualifications is the principle of trans-national supervision. In support of this principle ABA continuously develops, updates and enhances International qualifications skills standards & matrices.

Partner agreements include general procedures for cooperation; transfer of qualification credits; national awarding body responsibilities; certification endorsement etc.

Further, ABA endeavours to promote the mutual recognition of its member’s qualifications world-wide therefore reducing or removing potential barriers to employment and mobility.

The ABA’s Mission:

To facilitate, accredit, develop, support and promote the recognition of individuals national skills qualifications and certifications between partner countries worldwide

THE ABA’s Mission Objectives:

Establishing & setting certification standards: undertake a continuous review & improvement process to ensure they remain consistent and rigorous Quality assurance of the certification: ensure validation of content, currency, delivery and review methods are consistently maintained and comparible

ABA has the following key roles:

  • Qualification development: maintaining a support network with international educational advisors
  • National Awarding Body support: ensuring good practice is maintained, encouraged, developed and facilitating communication
  • National Awarding Body external inspections & vetting process: facilitating trans-national observations of training & assessment practices and awarding body audits
  • Promoting the principle of continuous improvement: facilitating exchange opportunities between National Awarding Body instructors, assessors and educational advisors

Why Get ABA Certification?

National skills certification demonstrates that you have achieved a recognised standard within your skills or chosen occupational sector. In addition, the ABA International ‘stamp of approval’ on your certification provides the following benefits:

  • Enhanced mobility: instant participating partner country recognition no need to re-take already proven training or skills tests to work abroad (saving time & money)
  • Enhanced employability: demonstrates your competency at an international level to current or potential future employers(helping to break-down barriers)
  • Enhanced credibility: demonstrates proof of your skills verified to rigorous national and international standards (high quality)

Are you an Arboriculture Canada Qualified Technician in a Chainsaw Domain?

Arboriculture Canada has been given equivalency for chainsaw qualification with the ABA in the following chainsaw training domains.  If you have taken a chainsaw qualification test and successfully become a Qualified Technician in one of these domains in the last five years (since January, 2010), you will be receiving an email inviting you to register yourself for the ABA Certification.  The only thing required to receive this ABA Certification is a $12 processing fee and you will then be registered with the ABA Registry (which is an online registrar).  You will immediately be registered as an ABA Certified Candidate internationally.

Arboriculture Canada Chainsaw Qualification Programs and ABA Equivalencies:

Arboriculture Canada Qualification ABA Qualification
Chainsaw Safety & Cutting Techniques (Chainsaw Operator Technician) Chainsaw Level 1:  Chainsaw Maintenance & Cross-cutting Techniques
Technical Tree Falling & Cutting (Tree Faller Technician) Chainsaw Level 1:  Chainsaw Maintenance & Cross-Cutting Techniques andChainsaw Level 2:  Basic Tree Felling Techniques
Hazard & Danger Tree Cutting & Falling (Hazardous Tree Falling Technician)  (provided you have received the Tree Faller Technician) Chainsaw Level 3:  Advanced Tree Felling Techniques andChainsaw Level 4:  Windblown & Damaged Tree Felling Techniques.

For any candidates who have taken customized tests with Arboriculture Canada through your organization or company in the chainsaw domain, please contact Nancy to inquire which equivalency is applicable to your test.

Arboriculture Canada is choosing to endorse and support the goals and aims of the ABA, as we believe that the intentions align nicely with our corporate vision and the recognition of ABA qualifications around the world will serve to improve the safety of working arborists and chainsaw operators.

Review of European chainsaw fatalities, accidents and trends

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

An interesting article on European chainsaw fatalities, accidents and trends.  http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/9PYNtwS2zW2FdAAX3p2T/full

Arboriculture Canada delivers Utility Tree Trimmer and Worker Training in Alberta – March, 2013

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

This March saw the first off campus delivery of the Utility Tree Worker (UTW)/Utility Tree Trimmer (UTT) training program in Alberta.  The Industrial Vegetation Management Association of Alberta (IVMAA) oversees the training program and certification of the provincially recognized certification. The UTW/UTT certification, is an Alberta provincially recognized certification that is mandatory for all persons who perform vegetation maintenance around energized power lines and ground work around energized power lines. It is also recognized by Saskatchewan and Manitoba through IVMA ManSask.   Before candidates can apply for this certification, they must take the UTW/UTT training program as this is a mandatory course required by all persons seeking to receive their UTW/UTT certification.

The IVMAA is the only recognized organization that can issue these provincially recognized certifications for successful UTW/UTT graduates. Successful candidates must have completed this training program and also accumulate 1200 hours working in proximity to energized electrical equipment, and these hours must be logged and verified in a log book by an already accredited UTW/UTT. The difference between a UTW and a UTT is that a UTT has to log a minimum of 600 hours working in proximity to energized electrical equipment from an aerial position.

The training component has been and continues to be traditionally delivered by Olds College in Olds, AB.   Arboriculture Canada has been getting requests for many years from customers who would like to get the UTW/UTT training but are unable to send their people away for two weeks or who missed the window when the course was offered at the college and are unable to wait until the next offer.

Arboriculture Canada delivers training components in their regular courses offerings to customers across Canada that is also part of the UTW training program and therefore has the resources to develop course content and materials for a Utility Tree Worker Training program. ArborCanada made a request through application to the IVMAA seeking recognized equivalence to the IVMAA UTW/UTT course.

Through a process of communications and meetings, Arboriculture Canada’s program was granted equivalency and a successful delivery of the program was completed in early March at an off campus location. This program was the culmination of many years of hard work, meetings and passing stringent requirements and in the end it was the first time since the beginning of the IVMAA UTW/UTT certification program that it was delivered off campus and the first time a private training company has delivered the course.  Arboriculture Canada’s course is stringent and broad in scope and combined with the electrical training it encompasses 13 days of training.

The group that received the training in March of 2013 was the East Prairie Metis Settlement. The Metis are first nation people who started families with the white settlers in the 1800’s.  There are over 500 thousand Metis in Canada today. The training took place at their site and location, near High Prairie Alberta, where the Great Plains and the boreal forest converge – a land of lakes, rivers, aspen, spruce and pine and the theoretical in-class learning was complimented by tying knots by the fire, climbing, rigging and other practical hands on time in the field.

Congratulations to the successful graduates of the first off campus Utility Tree Worker and Utility Tree Trimmer training and qualification program.

 


Trapped or Pinned – 5-15-90 Rule – Video testimonial

Saturday, March 10th, 2012

Trapped or Pinned – 5-15-90 Rule – Testimonial

Terry from the City of Winnipeg shares his experience of being pinned by a tree as it fell to the ground.

City of Red Deer arborists demonstrate the safe felling of a dead, snagged tree.

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

Jill demonstrates the safe felling technique of a dead and snagged tree, with the assistance of her co-workers using mechanical advantage and a pulling line.

CUT STRAIGHT!

Sunday, February 6th, 2011

  Arboriculture Canada chainsaw instructors and associates gathered together for Chainsaw Instructor Intensive Training Camp 2011, in the Peterborough, ON region at Elmhirst’s Resorts from Jan. 30 – Feb. 4th.  The purpose:  to review, develop and collaborate together on improving our teaching techniques and updating our course resources with a specific focus on technical tree falling, hazard & danger tree cutting and advanced chainsaw safety, operations and maintenance.

Nine instructors and industry experts from Canada and the US attended this intensive train the trainer program.  The group included: 

Dwayne Neustaeter – Train the Trainer Instructor

Dave Ward – Arboriculture Canada Instructor

John Ransom – Arboriculture Canada Instructor

Mark Cooke – Arboriculture Canada Instructor

Matt Logan – Arboriculture Canada Instructor

Danny LeBlanc – Arboriculture Canada Instructor

Michael Harrell – North American Training Solutions Instructor

Bob Smith – Humber College Instructor

Andrew Hordyk – Arboriculture Canada Instructor

Instructor Group - Chainsaw Intensive Train the Trainer

The program included an in depth analysis of the competency profiles for each of the chainsaw modules offered by Arboriculture Canada.  Teaching templates, power point materials, course workbooks and exam questions and format for all blocks of instruction in our chainsaw modules were reviewed and discussed.  The purpose of this process is to ensure that skills, techniques and methods are safe and modern and instructional material is consistent across the country in the following modules: 

  • Chainsaw Safety & Cutting Techniques
  • Technical Tree Falling & Cutting
  • Advanced Hazard & Danger Tree Cutting & Falling
  • Hazard & Danger Tree Cutting Techniques for Power Service Restoration

This panel of experts in our industry draws on a combined 150 plus years of experience using chainsaws and working in the urban forest, from owning and operating tree services, working for municipalities and teaching in college environments.  This experience, expertise and shared knowledge serve to strengthen and improve course curriculum and teaching methodologies of our courses.

Attendees delivered a block of instruction in camera and before their colleagues, which was followed by a peer review and feedback session on all aspects of the instruction, including the strengths and weaknesses; from introduction, use of accelerated teaching techniques and suggestions on ways to increase retention and the effectiveness of teaching the content.  A day was spent in the snow at the edge of the lake, studying and practicing advanced tree falling and cutting techniques.  An evening of chainsaw maintenance in the shop, tearing down saws, examining maintenance practices and learning from each other was a techie’s dream.

Our customers will see new course workbooks for all chainsaw training modules in 2011.  A complete rewrite of these modules has recently been completed, with accompanying photo’s, diagrams and illustrations to better supplement the learning during the training programs.  These new workbooks provide additional resource material which will strength the retention of learning and supply a resource that can be used following the course to remind students of the skills that they learned.  In time, this learning resource will be available for sale to arborists and chainsaw professionals outside of our student groups and around the world.

The mantra of the week – ‘Cut Straight’ – reverberated strong and was heartfelt.  Each instructor is passionate about teaching, and is especially passionate about reducing the accidents and fatalities caused by chainsaw accidents, cuts, and ‘struck-by’s when falling and cutting trees.  This week was dedicated to studying the techniques used in chainsaw operations and tree felling, as well as learning and practicing teaching skills that will continue to make the programs delivered by Arboriculture Canada instructors effective and leading edge.

The unique personality, passion, authenticity and power of purpose was evident and strong in this group.  Arboriculture Canada is proud and privileged to be associated with such quality people.  To quote the creativity and quick wit of Bob Smith – all our customers can be assured that our instructors ‘gauge the depth of their cutting edge personalities’! 

Arboriculture Canada offers instructor training privately for small groups of people.  Contact us to learn more about how you can get instructor training that reveals the secrets of how to deliver high energy, memorable and effective presentations using adult learning techniques such as; suggestology, accelerated learning, edutainment and educomedy.

Chainsaw Intensive Train the Trainer – A Glimpse!

Vegetation Management – Using the Mis-Match Cut to Free Hung or Snagged Trees on Power lines.

Saturday, December 4th, 2010

During and following severe storm events there is often a need to cut trees, remove large limbs and other debris off the power lines in order to begin the power restoration process. This work is often performed during the storm event or in conditions that are challenging due to weather, darkness and other factors. It is a known fact that working with a chainsaw is one of the most dangerous work procedures any worker can face, compound this with inclement weather and darkness and there is a potential for serious worker injury to occur.   

 Often the workers called on to perform these tasks are power linemen who may have received little specialized training in the skills needed to ensure their safety while working in these situations. Some time ago, while I was providing some basic chainsaw training for a utility client, I asked the student/lineman when they most likely used a chainsaw. Their answer was during or after storms to clear the lines in order to restore the power service. I knew the training we were there to provide did not cover this aspect of tree cutting and as a result, we developed and delivered a specialized curriculum to help lineman meet these challenges safely and efficiently.   

 Since then we have refined and developed techniques that help linemen cut trees and remove branches and debris from power lines. The most common risk that lineman take when cutting trees from the line is that they are typically standing too close to the cut, the line and the tree part when it is released. The review of logging accidents and fatalities indicate that when a cutter is within five feet of where the cutting and release takes place 90% of the accidents and fatalities occur.   

 It was with this in mind that we teach linemen how to use cutting techniques that allow the worker to be at a safe distance away when branches or trees are released. We can teach these techniques by using simple equipment already available and familiar to lineman. It is important that a lineman understand the severity of risk that exists when they are cutting trees hung on power systems.  Linemen already clearly understand the threat of electrocution.  It is the reactive forces of the chainsaw and trees that is most often not a part of the curriculum of most utility apprenticeship programs.   

 Training that teaches the correct techniques for basic tree cutting is necessary for linemen who cut trees on or near the power system during or after storm events in order to support and document due diligence for their occupational health and safety protocols. Documented training and qualification in techniques that provide options that can accommodate a variety of situations or scenarios addresses the problem and ensures diligence. In many cases linemen perform this work based on trial and error and the younger workers rely heavily and often solely on the experience of the seasoned journeyman lineman who often have learned the lessons the hard way. This leaves everyone exposed and at risk for a preventable and negligent inevitability.  If you have linemen or workers who perform these tasks, be sure that documentation of training and records exist that show your organization addresses the specialty situations posed by trees, tops or large limbs hung on the power lines.   

 Here is an example of a very simple technique that allows a cutter to be at a safer distant from a cut when it is released. In other words, it allows the cutter to be already away and in an escape route.  

Mis-match cut

 The mis-match cut or by-pass is a very simple and effective two-cut process that employs wood fibre strength to the cutters advantage. In addition by employing the use of a hand line, a common tool linemen use regularly, any lineman can cut a snagged or hung tree part and release it using the hand line from a safe working distance. Often one or two cuts will free the problem from the line allowing power restoration to commence.  

Making a mis-match cut

 This technique places the cuts in a staggered manner with the lowest of the cuts made in the direction of the intended pull. Attach the hand line to the tree part prior to commencing cutting. The cuts are made just pass half or through the mid way point of the diameter of the tree or branch. It is very important that the cuts are perpendicular to the force of gravity acting on the wood. Equally important is that both cuts bypass each other. The laminated strength of the wood fibres is strong enough to resist breaking, allowing time for the cutter to retreat and pull the piece free with the hand line at a safe distance. The pull of the hand line causes the kerf to close and the vertical wood fibre to release. 

If a mis-match / by-pass cut is unable to be released by pulling, the next option is to insert wedges into both kerfs and drive these wedges alternately until a small crack appears or any cracking or fracturing sound is heard.  It is very important that as soon as a crack is seen or heard that you stop driving the wedges and proceed to a safe distance.  In most cases pulling on the line at this point will release the snag.  Repeat the process as necessary.  

 The primary advantage of using this simple technique is that it allows the cutter to release the tree part at a safe working distance from falling debris, loaded power lines, flying branches or while holding a running chainsaw.  This technique is one of the most popular and is appreciated by linemen who have performed the work I have been describing. They recognize and appreciate the safety advantage this method provides and comment on how they wish they had learned it earlier in their careers. A short  2-3 day course can provide simple and effective work procedures that will improve linemen health and welfare while cutting trees from power lines during or after storm events in order to restore power to customers efficiently and safely. 

  The work many utility workers perform during or after storm events is not basic or ordinary. When called upon they enter an arena of risk seldom faced by many seasoned chainsaw workers – it makes sense that they receive training and education that provides the skills needed to face this dangerous work environment. 

  Dwayne Neustaeter