Posts Tagged ‘Tree Risk Assessment’

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. provides comprehensive safety and skills training to staff.

Friday, July 17th, 2015

Arborwood Tree Service Inc. is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 and 2016 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Biology & Care

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Tree Rope Access

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Aerial Lift Operations & Fall Protection

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in November of this year and in April of 2016.  The program is being partially funded by the Canada – Ontario Job Grant Program.

Arboriculture Canada customizes training programs to specifically meet the job requirements and unique training needs of your staff.  Our training programs are facilitated by experts in both adult education methods, as well as experts in the skills areas of arboriculture being taught.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety from the Canada Job Grant programs available in every province of Canada, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

Arborwood Tree Service is dedicated to providing superior customer service. Their great reputation is built on professionalism and customer satisfaction.  This training will ensure that staff meets this expectation.  www.arborwood.ca 

 

Advanced Tree Care provides high quality training to crews – 2015

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

Advanced Tree Care is investing in comprehensive safety and skills training for their staff in 2015 by hosting three weeks of training that will cover the topics of:

– Tree Dynamics & Integrated Risk Assessment

– Tree Climbing, Fall Protection & Work Positioning

– Emergency Readiness & High Angle Rescue

– Technical Tree Falling & Cutting

– Hazard and Danger Tree Cutting & Falling

– Aerial Lift Operations

– Aerial Lift Emergency Evacuation & Extrication

– Production Tree Removal & Rigging

– Arborist Technical Rigging

The training started with one week in May and will continue with weeks in August and October.  The program is being partially funded by the Ontario Job Grant Program.  If you are interested in receiving funds for training your staff internally in arboriculture skills and safety, please inquire with Arboriculture Canada to receive the information for applications.

This video highlights week one of their training program – thanks for Kevin Mengers and Advanced Tree Care for sharing this with us!

Video Highlights

Advanced Tree Care facebook page.

 

Accident Briefs from TCIA – June, 2013

Friday, August 16th, 2013

This is a posting to direct you to the Accident Briefs reported and published in the TCIA Auguist, 2013 issue.  The reports in this issue are for June, 2013.  Arboriculture Canada will be directing our customers to this information regularly as we have many phone calls in our office from people who are either unaware of the risks involved in tree care and the importance of training, or who are wishing to provide this data to their supervisors and/or family members.  The stats are often alarming, so we don’t post this to scare people, but rather to encourage people in this industry to pursue quality training!  Our mission is to help everyone go home safely to their families at the end of the work day!  Also, keep in mind that this data is US reported incidents, however, the same work is being done in other countries and stats are similar per population percentage.

http://tcia.org/digital_magazine/tci-magazine/2013/08/index.htm#?page=32

Identifying Hazardous Trees – interesting article

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

Read this interesting article from New York about the importance and significance of training arborists and parks workers to identify hazardous trees. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/nyregion/parks-workers-urged-to-get-training-to-spot-tree-decay.html?src=rechp