Arboriculture Canada is a National Awarding Body (NAB) with the ABA (Awarding Body Association) International.

June 3rd, 2014

We are proud to announce that we have been accepted as members of the ABA International body.  Arboriculture Canada is now a National Awarding Body (NAB).  We would like to introduce the ABA to our customers in Canada, and especially the candidates who have successfully achieved qualification status (chainsaw) through our testing process in the past years.   (other domains to come)

This article will introduce you to the ABA International, and tell you what credentialing through the ABA can do for you.    http://www.aba-skills.com/about.php

Who is the ABA?

ABA International (Awarding Body Association) was founded in 2012 in response to a demand for international recognition of qualifications gained at state or national levels. The trans-national mobility of qualified people facilitated by a voluntary partnership of national awarding bodies is a core principle of ABA.

ABA is managed on a minimum administrative basis in a cost effective manner. A simplified organisational structure provides each member country equal representation within the association.

National awarding bodies (NAB) are subject to an International accreditation and vetting process. Core to quality assurance and uniformity of the qualifications is the principle of trans-national supervision. In support of this principle ABA continuously develops, updates and enhances International qualifications skills standards & matrices.

Partner agreements include general procedures for cooperation; transfer of qualification credits; national awarding body responsibilities; certification endorsement etc.

Further, ABA endeavours to promote the mutual recognition of its member’s qualifications world-wide therefore reducing or removing potential barriers to employment and mobility.

The ABA’s Mission:

To facilitate, accredit, develop, support and promote the recognition of individuals national skills qualifications and certifications between partner countries worldwide

THE ABA’s Mission Objectives:

Establishing & setting certification standards: undertake a continuous review & improvement process to ensure they remain consistent and rigorous Quality assurance of the certification: ensure validation of content, currency, delivery and review methods are consistently maintained and comparible

ABA has the following key roles:

  • Qualification development: maintaining a support network with international educational advisors
  • National Awarding Body support: ensuring good practice is maintained, encouraged, developed and facilitating communication
  • National Awarding Body external inspections & vetting process: facilitating trans-national observations of training & assessment practices and awarding body audits
  • Promoting the principle of continuous improvement: facilitating exchange opportunities between National Awarding Body instructors, assessors and educational advisors

Why Get ABA Certification?

National skills certification demonstrates that you have achieved a recognised standard within your skills or chosen occupational sector. In addition, the ABA International ‘stamp of approval’ on your certification provides the following benefits:

  • Enhanced mobility: instant participating partner country recognition no need to re-take already proven training or skills tests to work abroad (saving time & money)
  • Enhanced employability: demonstrates your competency at an international level to current or potential future employers(helping to break-down barriers)
  • Enhanced credibility: demonstrates proof of your skills verified to rigorous national and international standards (high quality)

Are you an Arboriculture Canada Qualified Technician in a Chainsaw Domain?

Arboriculture Canada has been given equivalency for chainsaw qualification with the ABA in the following chainsaw training domains.  If you have taken a chainsaw qualification test and successfully become a Qualified Technician in one of these domains in the last five years (since January, 2010), you will be receiving an email inviting you to register yourself for the ABA Certification.  The only thing required to receive this ABA Certification is a $12 processing fee and you will then be registered with the ABA Registry (which is an online registrar).  You will immediately be registered as an ABA Certified Candidate internationally.

Arboriculture Canada Chainsaw Qualification Programs and ABA Equivalencies:

Arboriculture Canada Qualification ABA Qualification
Chainsaw Safety & Cutting Techniques (Chainsaw Operator Technician) Chainsaw Level 1:  Chainsaw Maintenance & Cross-cutting Techniques
Technical Tree Falling & Cutting (Tree Faller Technician) Chainsaw Level 1:  Chainsaw Maintenance & Cross-Cutting Techniques andChainsaw Level 2:  Basic Tree Felling Techniques
Hazard & Danger Tree Cutting & Falling (Hazardous Tree Falling Technician)  (provided you have received the Tree Faller Technician) Chainsaw Level 3:  Advanced Tree Felling Techniques andChainsaw Level 4:  Windblown & Damaged Tree Felling Techniques.

For any candidates who have taken customized tests with Arboriculture Canada through your organization or company in the chainsaw domain, please contact Nancy to inquire which equivalency is applicable to your test.

Arboriculture Canada is choosing to endorse and support the goals and aims of the ABA, as we believe that the intentions align nicely with our corporate vision and the recognition of ABA qualifications around the world will serve to improve the safety of working arborists and chainsaw operators.

Review of European chainsaw fatalities, accidents and trends

June 3rd, 2014

An interesting article on European chainsaw fatalities, accidents and trends.  http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/9PYNtwS2zW2FdAAX3p2T/full

Continental Connection – Winter 2014

April 15th, 2014
Front Page

Keep up with the ‘news’ from Arboriculture Canada!

Champions of Technology – ArborCanada Featured!

April 15th, 2014

Arboriculture Canada was recently selected to be interviewed as a Champion of Technology in our community of Olds, AB.  Thank you to the Olds Institute for Community and Regional Development for this honor and for making the video about our business and our website tools.  We are pleased to continue to serve the industries of arboriculture and other high angle worker and chainsaw professionals in Canada.  To watch the video:  http://vimeo.com/91366343

 

Vimeo - Champions of Technology

What Makes a Good Instructor?

February 6th, 2014

Recently printed in the Continental Connection newsletter.

What sets one instructor apart from the majority?  Arboriculture Canada Training & Education Ltd. has developed a process for training and mentoring instructors that serves to do exactly that.

DSC03632 cropaAs owner and lead instructor of ACTE, Dwayne Neustaeter began to train and mentor instructors many years ago.  He has developed a train the trainer program that takes individuals through exercises that challenge them to develop the presentation and communication skills necessary to not only facilitate effective learning in attendees, but also to make learning engaging, entertaining and fun.

Dwayne sends out weekly emails (Platoon Weekly) to a team of over 100 people who have attended past Train the Trainer events with him to remind them of the principles of effective instruction and presentation.  If you have ever had the good fortune of attending a course, session or presentation conducted by Dwayne, chances are you were engaged, entertained and you remember a good deal of what you learned during that session.

If you are currently a leader in your organization, whether a supervisor, a crew foreman, a trainer or the owner – you might be interested in some of the tips that we use when training and mentoring our instructors.  We thought we would share some of them in this issue with you.

A fundamental concept to good instruction we use to help instructors remember how important the context of a learning environment is – is that “DATA doesn’t MATTA”.  This simply means that the context of a teaching environment is just as important to the learning environment as the data or content of the course or session.  As Dwayne recently explained in a message to platoon members:

I learned a unique way to teach a lesson about tree assessment from Alex Shigo.  He would ask a group to list above ground tree parts, and the lists would be quite vast.  Then, he would ask everythone to list below ground tree parts, generally called roots, and the list would pale by comparison.  The lesson – there is a lot more known about the above ground tree parts than there is about the below ground tree parts.  This becomes a lesson in tree biology.  However, I can also compare this lesson to teaching.  There is a lot of emphasis put on the data or content aspect of teaching, and yet, all parts are important in any system.  If you focus most heavily in one area over another, you will have an imbalance, so Data (Content) does Matta, but not at the expense of Context.  They both need to be considered equally for there to be success in learning.  Teaching is like tree assessment and we have to consider all parts above and below ground, content and context, in order to make reasonable and reliable assessments and lesson plans.  I am as passionate about content and context management in the classroom as I am about my passion to learn and understand trees above and below ground.

Train the Trainer

Train the Trainer

Dwayne attended a program called “Ultimate Leadership Camp” with Peak Potentials in August of this year, together with his friend and colleague Andrew Hordyk.  This is what he had to say about that experience:

This past week Andrew and I attended a five day course called ‘Ultimate Leadership Camp’.  This camp was delivered by the same instructor and company that I took my trainer courses from years ago, the courses from which I developed the content and format for the instructor/trainer intensives that Arboriculture Canada delivers.  It was a great course and one of the biggest things I learned was that as trainers or instructors we are also leaders – this goes hand in hand . . . like air and light, sun and heat or smell and taste.  The only difference between a leader and an instructor/trainer is timing and appointment.  There are times when you are the instructor/trainer by designation, however leaders are chosen by those they are together with.  Leadership is one of those things that other gives you – like your reputation.  The following is a list of some characteristics of a leader we learned at the course.  I challenge you to practice them in your life and watch what happens.

 

Accountable – take responsibility for results

Decisive – make decisions quickly

Courageous- act in spite of fear

Assertive – speak with authority, not aggressiveness

Calm- unemotional regardless of situation

Optimistic – believe things will work out

Confident – trust and believe in yourself

Compassionate – be understanding and care for others

Creative – plan, strategize and problem solve

Flexibility – adapt and be willing to embrace change

Integrity- be reliable and do what you say . . . ALWAYS

Passionate- never quit or give up

Action – act quickly and concisely when it is safe and secure

Pro-Active – take action on problems or opportunities as you see them develop . . . make things occur.

There are many important components of planning a training program, lesson plan, meeting or event that will facilitate and allow for trust and openness amongst participants and effective lasting learning.  Dwayne addresses them one by one in his trainer programs, as well as through his weekly messages.  The following is a weekly message that he wrote just prior to delivering a recent Chainsaw Train the Trainer event as he was preparing.

This week as I prepared for the Chainsaw Train the Trainer program, I was thinking about all the past classes and the memories I have each and every intensive I have been a part of.  I look forward to the learning that I know I will gain from working with new people with new experiences.  I am always reminded of the story about the mental tool box.  I first heard this story from Tim Ard and I have never forgotten it and have told it myself many times over.

Training and education truly is a journey, not a destination, and like the old toolbox in your garage or in your truck, your mental toolbox is dialy exposed to new experiences and interactions, particularly at a training event like a seminar or course.  It is important to remind people that you are teaching or leading that your purpose is simply to add to their mental toolbox.  Many of us had a junk drawer of tools, trinkets, special wrenches from the last BBQ or children’s toy you assembled.  The box gets bigger and bigger and for the most part you don’t throw much of it away, even though you may not use each tool very often or ever.  Why don’t you throw anything away?  The reason is because you know what that tool is for . . . and you might use it one day.  Experiences, training and education is a lot like that.  Each learning is valuable and means something specific to you.  When you are in a leadership or teaching position, you can start with this analogy and encourage enrollment from the class.  (by asking them to mimic the opening of the brain with their hands above their heads . . .)   It is a good way to let the audience know you are there to help, and more importantly you can end the session by reminding them of the toolbox analogy and request them to do one thing.  What is that request?  Ask everyone to simply keep an open mind because like a toolbox, if it is closed, nothing can get in!

It is such a great analogy because it also illustrates the important connection between training, education, information and experience, and how one without the other is not complete.  So much of how we learn is through synthesis of knowledge into practice – experience is the qualifier.  True or True!

Open up your toolbox to learn more!

Open up your toolbox to learn more!

Part of our trainer program involves the way that an instructor begins or introduces a program to a group of attendees.  They are taught to do the following things:

  1.  Scan
  2. Welcome, acknowledge, edify and name of talk
  3. W.I.I.F.M. (What’s in it for me?)
  4. E.T.R. (Earn the Right)

Each trainer is taught in detail the importance of each of these steps and examples of how to implement and practice this in relation to the topics of the content.  Dwayne wrote a short lesson on Earn The Right (E.T.R.) as follows:

How many of you have learned a lesson or gained respect for someone from listening to their story?

E.T.R. is where you tell a story that relates and applies to the topic you are teaching. It is a true story that explains why you are qualified to teach the course or present the topic. The story should be designed to give you the right to present on the topic and it should make your students understand that you know the material and have the experience to back up what you are going to be talking about. A good ETR is passionate and authentic, remember your truth is in your passion, and people don’t care what you know until they know that you care. An ETR can include or be a relational story about something you witnessed that impacted your life and/or effected change in you.

Your ETR builds confidence and ties in with your WIIFM. After your ETR your students are even more excited to hear what you have to say. Your ETR is personal and it is where you begin to establish a fundamental trust with your audience by making yourself vulnerable. It often is a story of a challenge or character building experience in which you learned a hard valuable lesson, a lesson you want to help other’s learn more easily. The basic concept is that we don’t have enough time to make all of the mistakes ourselves and that experience is one of our most valuable teachers, and so the more we can learn from others experiences the better, TRUE or TRUE.

A good ETR shows a willingness and more importantly a commitment to learn and share, like in all things practice and stick with stories that have worked well in the past. Your ETR is about experiences, it gives a relational human quality that resonates with those listening, it helps others relate and connect with you.

These are all snippets of advice from a master of instruction.  Dwayne has spent many years teaching around the world to people of many ages, walks of life and occupations.  He connects with people in a relational way and he learns from everyone he interacts with.  He has a gift of teaching – and those of you that have learned from him can understand his passion.

These are some of the principles that Arboriculture Canada nurtures in the instructors we use to teach our programs.  Dwayne and our team of instructors looks forward to working with more learners in 2014, and thanks all those attendees in 2013 for your participation, your passion and your commitment to learning!

Free Falling – novel written by ACTE Instructor – Tony Tresselt

November 29th, 2013

CoverI love stories.  They help us learn, remember, connect.  They can bind cultures and cohorts. They often define friends and enemies.   Arboriculture is rich with history, personalities and events.  It makes for great stories whether truth, fiction or somewhere in between.  With my first novel Free Falling I plunge into the world of competitive tree climbing, the sights, the sounds, the people.  Here is an excerpt from the back cover.

A small group of ecoterrorists storms a Pacific Northwest logging site.  Equipment is vandalized, buildings broken into and a surprise discovery is made by one member of the group; one that could solve all his current problems.

Day one of the International Tree Climbing Championship winds to a close.  Fifty-six men and women climbers have given their best in the preliminaries.  The final climber in the work climb event begins his run.  All eyes are watching him.  Unexpectedly, his rope parts and he plunges to his death mid swing…

Mike Duncan, arborist and former Special Forces solider, watches the climber plummet to earth from his perch high in the tree.  Later, after the crowd disperses, Mike, ascends the work climb tree.  There, high in the canopy, he makes a discovery of his own…

Buy it now through Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Free-Falling-An-Arboreal-Novel/dp/1604949759/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1385754294&sr=8-15&keywords=Free+Falling

The Women’s Arboriculture Conference – Mar. 5 – 7, 2014

October 29th, 2013

The Women’s Arboriculture Conference is a unique experience as it is an inter-disciplinary forum addressing trees, their place in our world and our relationship with them. Speakers and delegates who are arborists, foresters, horticulturalists, landscape architects and designers, land planners and managers, and master gardeners are meeting with the shared purpose of discussing and problem-solving tree-related issues.

When:  Mar. 5 – 7, 2014

What:  The Women’s Arboriculture Conference provides a venue where women speakers, under represented at industry conferences, who are expert in their fields, provide solid technical, management, and policy information, creating an interdisciplinary environment where professionals can expand their viewpoints and make lasting, productive connections.

Where:  The 2014 Conference will be held
at Harrison Hot Springs Resort and Spa
http://www.harrisonresort.com

URL:  http://www.womenarborists.ca/

 

Arboriculture Canada is proud to sponsor and support this event.

Standard Operating Procedures or Guidelines

September 26th, 2013

This presentation was given by Dwayne Neustaeter at both the Western Chapter and the ISA Annual Conferences, and he would be happy to visit other chapters to present his findings on Standard Operating Procedures in the future.  Printed by SCA Today – August, 2013 

Does your company have policies and procedures?

Do you have a checklist or document that simply and concisely shows how your organization meets industry standards or best practices?

Standard Operating procedures and guidelines provide a detailed and specific explanation or list of how your staff performs various work activities, especially ones where no industry standard exists, such as static single rope work positioning.

The difference between policy and procedures is that they are generic, the same is true for industry standards like ANSI or CSA, they are there to serve as a guide but do not provide detailed specifics in implementation. Standard operating procedures or guidelines are unique to a company or organization. Industry standards and governmental regulation are developed by committee and are therefore inherently generic. Standard operating procedures should be developed by the people who are doing the work; everyone who is part of the organization should be part of the development of SOP’s or SOG’s.

Many people ask for a copy of an SOP or SOG that is already developed; this is where the process could begin to break down. I am not saying that we need to re-invent the wheel, but as we all know many aspects of tree work have subtle variances and nuances; a company’s SOP’s and SOG’s are where these are to be noted or documented. A well-developed SOG or SOP well explain or identify the variations in technique and/or implementation that is unique to your organization. Make it your own!

Some of the history of SOP’s and SOG’s lies with the fire service, and I believe there some unique similarities between tree work and firefighting. The most obvious is the unique nature of fire: every fire has its own way of burning, no one structure fire is the same as any other, there are far too many variables that can come into play. In tree work, the tree is our fire: every tree is unique, no one tree is the same as any other. Another similarity between the fire service and the tree industry is geographic and local variation. In the fire service, building construction and type carries dramatically within a geographical location; the same holds true for trees. Even trees of the same species will have vastly different wood characteristics in different parts of the country or geographical region.

With nothing to work from, fire departments needed to develop some guidelines and procedures to help everyone learn from other’s experiences and provide some type of proof that they were operating in a safe and reputable fashion. Firefighting is a work environment that is very difficult to be assessed or understood by inspectors or investigators, the same is true for the tree care industry. When there is a fatality, the questions start to get asked and generally tree care companies are not prepared and do not have the documentation that can explain or show that they were working to meet safety and due diligence requirements. In these cases, it is simply not enough to provide certifications and credentialing. Ask anyone who has had to experience and live through the death of an employee.

In learning about and researching this topic, I found that there are some distinctions made between SOP’s and SOG’s. The following is an overview of both as I understand them.

Standard Operating Procedures:

1.   Document how your organization performs certain work activities, and your compliance with current industry standards or legislation,

2.   Have been developed by everyone involved in performing those activities,

3.   Address prioritized high risk work activities your company or organization performs; and are

4.   Specific and detailed and include industry standard references regarding specifications.

Standard Operating Guidelines are:

1.   Similar to operating procedures, but exist solely to provide guidance where no industry standard exists.

I know that the terms are often used interchangeably and not everyone bothers to make a distinction of one from the other. I also know that companies who want to be prepared for the day a ‘bad’ accident arrives are developing more refined work procedures like SOP’s or SOG’s. The evidence is in the fatality statistics we all hear about, and that alone should be enough to show that we need to do everything we can to ensure the safety of our workforce. It is incumbent on all of us involved in this business of arboriculture.

The following is an example of a SOG I have worked on; remember to make your SOG or SOP your own. The best way to develop your own is to have all workers involved play a key role in the development of your organization’s SOP’s or SOG’s.

Tree Climbing Standard Operating Guideline -2013

Static or Single Rope Tree Climbing Systems – SRT

I.      Tree climbers are workers who are competent in the establishment of tree climbing systems, from equipment selection to implementation.

II.      Tree climbers must have all necessary Personal Protective Equipment, including: hard hat, eye protection, and appropriate footwear.

III.      All climbing equipment must be Industry approved.

IV.      Each tree to be climbed is risk assessed and inspected for strength and stability, specifically the root system and tie in locations.

a.   Trees to be climbed are to be visually inspected and, when deemed necessary, further assessed by being sounded with a mallet and/or field pull tested, prior to selecting tie in location.

b.   Tie in locations must be visible from the ground prior to ascending. If tie in locations are not visible, a lower visible tie in location must be selected and or alternate ascent methods, such as spurs, utilized.

c.   Tie in locations must be a minimum diameter of 6 inches and climbing lines must be attached to these tie locations in such a way as to minimize drifting or sliding of the line away from the stem or along the branch.

d.   Tie in locations must be on branches that have strong, more open ‘U’ shaped attachments not narrow or tight ‘V’ shaped.


V.      An approved climbing line is installed onto a selected temporary anchor point location in the canopy of the tree and one end of the climbing line is anchored to the base of the tree being climbed.

VI.      The temporary anchor point is field tested by performing pull and load tests.

VII.      Approved connecting links, cordage and harnesses are selected and knots and hitches are tied, dressed and set to establish a static suspension climbing system.

a.   Approved cordage with termination knots or eye splices is used to tie a climbing hitch to the static line with approved connecting links.

b.   A dynamic climbing system (as described in DdRT) connects the climber to the climbing hitch and static line with approved connecting links and pulleys.

c.   An ascending device is attached to the lead of the static line below the climbing hitch d.   Climbing aids and tethers are attached to the ascending device

VIII.      The climber ascends in the static suspension climbing system and then repositions to a dynamic working system to conduct work activities.

a.    The repositioning to a dynamic system can be done by establishing a new temporary anchor point or by spiking the static line just below the static climbing hitch and working off of the dynamic system attaching the climber to the static line; however the static suspension system is primarily used for entry only into tall tree canopies.

IX.      All work is performed with the climber tied in at all times, and when operating saws the worker shall be double tied.

X.      Whenever feasible during ascent, the climber shall utilize a lanyard or secondary climbing system as a back-up.

XI.      In the event a climber has to establish another temporary anchor point it must also be inspected and assessed prior to use, and the temporary anchor and climbing system must be load tested prior to use.

XII.      Tree climbers climb smoothly and avoid unnecessary shock loading that can be generated by swings or falls, this is achieved by keeping all lines tensioned and slack free at all times and by employing the use of a work positioning lanyard whenever possible, especially when using saws.

XIII.      Tree climbers shall not climb above their temporary anchor points or climb horizontally or away from the temporary anchor point to where their climbing rope angle exceeds 45 degrees from the perpendicular axis of the temporary anchor point.

I trust this has expanded your knowledge and has helped you understand the differences between certifications, industry standards, legislation, operating procedures and guidelines. The most challenging and rewarding aspect of developing these type of documents is getting all workers participating and involved. Though this requires the investment of resources like time, the benefits of getting everyone talking about how they do things and with what kind of tools and equipment include not only the reduction of accidents and injury, but the process of development and implementation helps build morale, and improves workers’ knowledge and understanding of their position. Really, it is a win-win investment.

Dwayne Neustaeter is the current President-elect on the SCA Board, and is also the President of Arboriculture Canada, an organization focusing on meeting the training and education needs of arborists and those in related industries. Dwayne’s background and experience complement his current activities of instructing, program development, and qualification testing in the field. He instructs training programs and seminars on safety and a wide range of skills for arborists around the world.

Accident Briefs from TCIA – June, 2013

August 16th, 2013

This is a posting to direct you to the Accident Briefs reported and published in the TCIA Auguist, 2013 issue.  The reports in this issue are for June, 2013.  Arboriculture Canada will be directing our customers to this information regularly as we have many phone calls in our office from people who are either unaware of the risks involved in tree care and the importance of training, or who are wishing to provide this data to their supervisors and/or family members.  The stats are often alarming, so we don’t post this to scare people, but rather to encourage people in this industry to pursue quality training!  Our mission is to help everyone go home safely to their families at the end of the work day!  Also, keep in mind that this data is US reported incidents, however, the same work is being done in other countries and stats are similar per population percentage.

http://tcia.org/digital_magazine/tci-magazine/2013/08/index.htm#?page=32

Arboriculture Canada delivers Utility Tree Trimmer and Worker Training in Alberta – March, 2013

June 6th, 2013

This March saw the first off campus delivery of the Utility Tree Worker (UTW)/Utility Tree Trimmer (UTT) training program in Alberta.  The Industrial Vegetation Management Association of Alberta (IVMAA) oversees the training program and certification of the provincially recognized certification. The UTW/UTT certification, is an Alberta provincially recognized certification that is mandatory for all persons who perform vegetation maintenance around energized power lines and ground work around energized power lines. It is also recognized by Saskatchewan and Manitoba through IVMA ManSask.   Before candidates can apply for this certification, they must take the UTW/UTT training program as this is a mandatory course required by all persons seeking to receive their UTW/UTT certification.

The IVMAA is the only recognized organization that can issue these provincially recognized certifications for successful UTW/UTT graduates. Successful candidates must have completed this training program and also accumulate 1200 hours working in proximity to energized electrical equipment, and these hours must be logged and verified in a log book by an already accredited UTW/UTT. The difference between a UTW and a UTT is that a UTT has to log a minimum of 600 hours working in proximity to energized electrical equipment from an aerial position.

The training component has been and continues to be traditionally delivered by Olds College in Olds, AB.   Arboriculture Canada has been getting requests for many years from customers who would like to get the UTW/UTT training but are unable to send their people away for two weeks or who missed the window when the course was offered at the college and are unable to wait until the next offer.

Arboriculture Canada delivers training components in their regular courses offerings to customers across Canada that is also part of the UTW training program and therefore has the resources to develop course content and materials for a Utility Tree Worker Training program. ArborCanada made a request through application to the IVMAA seeking recognized equivalence to the IVMAA UTW/UTT course.

Through a process of communications and meetings, Arboriculture Canada’s program was granted equivalency and a successful delivery of the program was completed in early March at an off campus location. This program was the culmination of many years of hard work, meetings and passing stringent requirements and in the end it was the first time since the beginning of the IVMAA UTW/UTT certification program that it was delivered off campus and the first time a private training company has delivered the course.  Arboriculture Canada’s course is stringent and broad in scope and combined with the electrical training it encompasses 13 days of training.

The group that received the training in March of 2013 was the East Prairie Metis Settlement. The Metis are first nation people who started families with the white settlers in the 1800’s.  There are over 500 thousand Metis in Canada today. The training took place at their site and location, near High Prairie Alberta, where the Great Plains and the boreal forest converge – a land of lakes, rivers, aspen, spruce and pine and the theoretical in-class learning was complimented by tying knots by the fire, climbing, rigging and other practical hands on time in the field.

Congratulations to the successful graduates of the first off campus Utility Tree Worker and Utility Tree Trimmer training and qualification program.